Dolls And Action Figures

Character Options Action Figures Doctor who 11 Doctors Set



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Many people have been fans of Doctor Who since childhood and over the years, they have amassed quite a large collection of Doctor Who memorabilia - DVDs, books, signed photos and the like. The action figures have become very popular over the years and one of the latest releases has been the Character Options Doctor Who Eleven Doctors set. This is currently available from Amazon UK for £52.99.

The figures are arranged in a huge box in the design of a TARDIS. The doors of the TARDIS open to reveal the figures in the middle and on each side of the flaps, there are photos and profiles of the eleven actors who have played the Doctor from its first episode in 1963 to the present day.

Each figure is very accurately modelled on the actors. They all seem to be correctly proportioned, as the Hartnell and Troughton figures are much smaller than the Eccleston and Pertwee ones, for example, as they were in real life. They are described as five inch action figures, but some are bigger than others!

They are poseable with jointed arms and knees. Each Doctor is dressed in their standard outfit for their tenure and come equipped with their trademark accessory - except for the poor Sixth doctor, but he wasn't really associated with a particular item except that gaudy coat, which is here in all its glory!

So looking at each one individually...

THE FIRST DOCTOR (1963-1966)

The First Doctor was played by William Hartnell in the 1960s and the figure is excellent. It has even captured that grumpy expression perfectly! He has his white-grey hair slicked back, his waistcoat, floppy tie, long black jacket, grey trousers and black shoes. The flaps of the jacket can be pulled slightly and he comes with a long black walking stick which can be put in either hand. He is even wearing a ring on both hands!

THE SECOND DOCTOR (1966-1969)

The Second Doctor was played by Patrick Troughton in the 1960s. Another small guy, this has also captured the likeness of Troughton beautifully. He is usually associated with fun and laughter though and this model looks decidedly fed up. The hair is great, that Beatle mop top do is excellently recreated. He's sporting a blue shirt, long black jacket with a handkerchief in the pocket, checked trousers and shiny black shoes. His bowtie is slightly crooked and again the jacket flaps can be moved a bit. His accessory is his recorder which can be placed in either hand.

THE THIRD DOCTOR (1970-1974)

The Third Doctor was played by Jon Pertwee in the 1970s. Again, the figure is recognisable although the eyes seem a bit pale. His hair is white and curly, which is an interesting texture. His outfit consists of a light green shirt, dark green jacket (Ugh) then a long brown cloak with an orange lining (which looks like it could be removed). Dark trousers and long black boots complete the outfit and his accessory is a sonic screwdriver.

THE FOURTH DOCTOR (1974-1981)

The Fourth Doctor was played by Tom Baker for seven years and is probably the most iconic Doctor for those of a certain age. Again the figure is recognisable as Tom, though the mouth is slightly wrong. He has his wild dark curly hair under his trademark hat (which sadly can't be removed). He is wearing a multi-coloured waistcoat, an orange tie, long pale (moveable) jacket, grey trousers that are a bit long and brown shoes. The best bit of all is the long trademark scarf which is brilliant! As well as being beautifully coloured and designed, you can also move it and it is a wonderful texture you just have to touch! He also comes with his own mini sonic screwdriver.

THE FIFTH DOCTOR (1982-1984)

The Fifth Doctor was played by Peter Davison for two years in the 1980s. It has been said before that it is hard to capture Peter's likeness, but they have done a good job with this action figure, as it really does look like him. He is wearing the famous cricketing costume - white shirt and jumper, beige jacket with red piping and the stripy trousers. The outfit is rounded off by white trainers and his famous leek is on his lapel, where it should be. He comes with a sonic screwdriver, but those things are absolutely miniscule and easy to lose.

THE SIXTH DOCTOR (1984-1986)

The Sixth Doctor was played by Colin Baker in the mid-1980s. This is a reasonable likeness, though maybe the least accurate face of all. His curly hair is excellent though and the detail in the outfit is amazing, there is even a tiny cat badge on the lapel! The red jacket is there in all its many bits of design and the yellow stripy trousers certainly make this figure stand out on the shelf! He doesn't come with an accessory of his own.

THE SEVENTH DOCTOR (1987-1996)

The Seventh Doctor was played by tiny Scottish actor Sylvester McCoy, who was in the role when the series ended and regenerated into Paul McGann in the 1996 TV movie. Whilst being recognisable, the mouth doesn't look quite right here and there's no hat either. His outfit is beautifully made though - brown jacket with paisley scarf, question mark tank top, tie, checked brown trousers and an oversized handkerchief sticking out his pocket. He carries his famous black and red umbrella.

THE EIGHTH DOCTOR (1996)

The Eighth Doctor was played by Paul McGann is the 1996 TV movie. Again, the facial likeness could have been better, but you can tell who it is meant to be. He is sporting the elegant attire of the character - long coat, smart tie and waistcoat, long grey trousers and shiny black shoes. Again the jacket flaps are slightly moveable and there is great detail here with even creases in the bottom of the trousers. He comes with his own sonic screwdriver too and each model is slightly different, reflecting how the screwdriver itself evolved over the series.

THE NINTH DOCTOR (2005)

Moving on to the modern series, Christopher Eccleston played the Ninth Doctor for one series in 2005. This one is a good likeness; you can almost hear his Northern accent! His neck looks a bit strange as it is the only one that doesn't have a tie or scarf or something around it, so you can see the join. He is wearing a tight V-necked brown top, the black leather jacket is great (and bendable!) and he is wearing black trousers and shoes. He has his own blue-tipped sonic screwdriver.

THE TENTH DOCTOR (2005-2009)

David Tennant played the Tenth Doctor for four years and this figure does resemble him, though with the black-rimmed glasses, it might be mistaken for a twenty-five year old Harry Potter! The long brown coat is bendy plastic and underneath, he is sporting his classy blue pinstriped suit and red and white trainers. It is a wonderful outfit and really well made, but the glasses were maybe a mistake. He has his sonic screwdriver poised ready for action too. Many women are big admirers of David's sonic screwdriver and wish they could have a play with it.

THE ELEVENTH DOCTOR (2010- )

The current Doctor is the Eleventh Doctor played by Matt Smith. This is a good likeness with his floppy fringe (another 'must-touch' feature) and high cheekbones. He is wearing a pale stripy shirt, brown bowtie, short brown jacket, black trousers and black boots. His sonic screwdriver is the new design, with its silver prongs sticking out ready for the next Dalek who doesn't want a Jammie Dodger.

OVERALL

Overall, the figures are great, but they do have a couple of disadvantages. They can be a bit tricky to balance if you want to keep the figures standing up. The set suggests it is not suitable for under-fives but maybe a child needs to be a bit older, as the figures are quite delicate in some areas and there are small accessories which could easily be lost, so maybe 8-10 should be the minimum age.

The figures are very good and although the price is a lot to fork out, eleven action figures for around £50 doesn't seem too bad if you work out how much you are getting for your money. This set looks great and would be a wonderful addition to any Doctor Who fan or collector of action figures.

More about this author: Karen Louise Hollis

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